The Nation

The Nation
associated with
The Nation

Taking Quebec Seriously

Taking Quebec Seriously

Taking Quebec Seriously

Taking Quebec Seriously

Taking Quebec Seriously

April 28, 1979
April 1979
Taking Quebec Seriously
Focuses on general elections scheduled to be held in Canada in May 1979 while discussing chief executive officer of Quebec René Lévesque's promise to his province for a referendum on separation after the elections. Confusion among Canadians regarding Lévesque's promise; Possibility of victory of Lévesque in the elections; Discussion on a sovereignty-association proposed by Lévesque.

A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime

A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime

A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime

A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime

A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime

June 17, 1978
June 1978
A Mime Troupe Tests the Regime
Discusses the case of Els Joglars, a Catalan mime troupe convicted of insulting the Spanish Army. Embarrassment to the self-proclaimed Spanish democracy of King Juan Carlos and Premier Adolfo Suarez; Flaws in Spain's attempt at transition from the dictatorship of the late Francisco Franco to a parliamentary government.

Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy

Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy

Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy

Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy

Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy

February 7, 1976
February 1976
Reacting to Big-Stick Diplomacy
Examines key aspects of political and economic relations between Mexico and the U.S. Emphasis on Mexican dependence on American support; Ways by which American culture, organization and products set the standards for Mexicans; Factors contributing to conflicts of interest between the two countries; Extent of Mexican dependence to the U.S.; Comparison of the political and economic conditions; Difficulties involved in relations between a powerful country and its weak neighbor.

Still Loyal to the Loyalists

Still Loyal to the Loyalists

Still Loyal to the Loyalists

Still Loyal to the Loyalists

Still Loyal to the Loyalists

November 15, 1975
November 1975
Still Loyal to the Loyalists
Reports on Mexican President Luis Echeverria Alvarez's reaction to Spain's Generalisimo Francisco Franco's execution of five revolutionaries in Spain in September 1975. Echeverria's description of the Spanish dictatorship; Call to the United Nations Security Council to expel Spain from the U.N.; Destruction of Echeverria's campaign to succeed Kurt Waldheim as Secretary General in 1976.

Return to a Disaster

Return to a Disaster

Return to a Disaster

Return to a Disaster

Return to a Disaster

October 12, 1974
October 1974
Return to a Disaster
Focuses on relations between the U.S. and Haiti as of October 1974. Reasons for the stoppage of foreign aid to Haiti by the U.S. Agency for International Development in 1963; Factors that contributed to industrial establishments by U.S. businessmen in Haiti; State of agricultural production in the country in the 1970s.

The Blacks of Panama

The Blacks of Panama

The Blacks of Panama

The Blacks of Panama

The Blacks of Panama

June 22, 1974
June 1974
The Blacks of Panama
Focuses on the conflict between the U.S. and Panama over the issue of control over Panama canal. Assessment of negotiations between them for a treaty to solve the dispute; Overview of the problem of Black population in the canal zone controlled by the U.S.; Information on the construction of the canal; Appraisal of steps taken by the U.S. government to improve relations between the two countries.

Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa

Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa

Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa

Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa

Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa

July 16, 1973
July 1973
Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa
Focuses on Jehovah's Witnesses, a social movement against Nazis, as of July 16, 1973. Number of members of Jehovah's Witnesses in Africa; Founder of Jehovah's Witnesses; Factors that led to the establishment of Jehovah's Witnesses.
No items found.

Ten Years of Fratricide

Ten Years of Fratricide

Ten Years of Fratricide

Ten Years of Fratricide

Ten Years of Fratricide

December 6, 1971
December 1971
Ten Years of Fratricide
The article discusses the genocide in Sudan. For more than a decade, an obscure civil war has ravaged Sudan. Largely ignored by the rest of the world, it is Africa's longest war, paralyzing the Sudan's three southern provinces intermittently from 1955 and continuously from 1963. The war has led to perhaps a half-million deaths and has forced 200,000 southerners to flee for refuge in neighboring countries. All the terror and turmoil have come from cultural hatred. The Sudan is the largest country in Africa, about a third the size of the United States, with a north of scrublands and sandy, arid hills, and a south of forests and grasslands. Swamps separate the two regions.
No items found.

Kenya's Asian Outcasts

Kenya's Asian Outcasts

Kenya's Asian Outcasts

Kenya's Asian Outcasts

Kenya's Asian Outcasts

September 1, 1969
September 1969
Kenya's Asian Outcasts
This article discusses about the Asians settled in Nairobi, Kenya. Most of the shops of downtown Nairobi are in the hands of Indians and Pakistanis. Living in a land run by African blacks, are the most visible evidence of the gravest minority problem in East Africa today. There are 350,000 Asians, as the Indians and Pakistanis are called here, among East Africa's 29 million people. About half of them live in Kenya, a quarter in Tanzania, a quarter in Uganda. They are the shopkeepers, clerks, artisans and foreman of East Africa. The Asians fill just those jobs and places that Africans believe they now have enough experience and training to take. Although they are called Asians, many either were born in East Africa or have spent most of their lives there. They consider East Africa as their home.

After Tom Mboya

After Tom Mboya

After Tom Mboya

After Tom Mboya

After Tom Mboya

August 11, 1969
August 1969
After Tom Mboya
The aftermath of the murder of Kenyan political leader Tom Mboya has mocked what he stood for. Mboya, who seemed to represent all that was modern in Africa to the rest of the world, always shunned the appeals to tribal allegiance that have crumbled political stability elsewhere in Africa. His constituents were mainly the urban workers groping for a modern way of life. Yet his assassination on the first Saturday in July, 1969 unleashed intense tribal hatreds. Kenya faces a long and dangerous period of instability unless the government can somehow placate his grieving Luo people.

Biafra: War of Images

Biafra: War of Images

Biafra: War of Images

Biafra: War of Images

Biafra: War of Images

March 10, 1969
March 1969
Biafra: War of Images
Images play as important a role as guns in the Nigerian civil war. The Biafran secessionists, among Africa's most sophisticated peoples, have known from the beginning that their chances for success depended as much, on evoking world sympathy as on holding back the federal army. Now, after twenty months of war, it is clear that the Biafrans have been far more adept at propaganda than soldiering. If they survive in some sovereign form, they will owe it to their skill with images. Part of the Biafran success in public relations stems from the federal Nigerian Government's failure at it.

New Mission to Africa

New Mission to Africa

New Mission to Africa

New Mission to Africa

New Mission to Africa

January 13, 1969
January 1969
New Mission to Africa
The article discusses various aspects of the U.S. foreign policy in Africa. For years, the American Federation of Labor & Congress of Industrial Organization (AFL-CIO) has pursued its own foreign policy in Latin America and now it is turning to Africa. In January 1968 Vice President H. Humphrey visited Kenya with a large party that included executive director Irving Brown. Despite unpopularity Brown's African American Labor Center was set up in 1965 in Kenya. The Center often gives office equipment and cars to African unions or creates vocational training schools. But the Center also tries to fulfill the traditional AFL-CIO role of helping non-Communist unions fight alleged Communist union.

Breakup in Nigeria

Breakup in Nigeria

Breakup in Nigeria

Breakup in Nigeria

Breakup in Nigeria

October 9, 1967
October 1967
Breakup in Nigeria
The article presents information on the civil war in Nigeria. Two simple posters explain the civil war in Nigeria. The first, a thin strip, was glued to the walls and windows of most public buildings in Enugu, the capital of Eastern Nigeria, a few weeks before the region seceded to become the Republic of Biafra. The first poster reflects the intense tribal feeling of the Ibos of Eastern Nigeria. They are enraged and bitter over the massacre of thousands of Ibos in Northern Nigeria last year. They believe the other tribes of Nigeria would wipe them out if they could. For this reason, the Ibos feel they are fighting for theft survival. The second poster, a little larger and more colorful, was slapped all over Lagos, the federal capital of Nigeria, a few weeks before federal troops invaded Biafra, the beginning of the civil war.

And a Cold Eye

And a Cold Eye

And a Cold Eye

And a Cold Eye

And a Cold Eye

October 4, 1965
October 1965
And a Cold Eye
Reviews the book "Africa from Independence to Tomorrow," by David Hapgood.
Africa from Independence to Tomorrow
No items found.

Our Stake in Apartheid

Our Stake in Apartheid

Our Stake in Apartheid

Our Stake in Apartheid

Our Stake in Apartheid

August 16, 1965
August 1965
Our Stake in Apartheid
In 1963, during a Security Council debate on apartheid, politician Adlai Stevenson announced dramatically that the U.S. had banned all sale of arms to the Republic of South Africa. The step had been taken, he said, to show U.S. government's deep concern that South Africa refused to abandon its racist policies. In March 1963, a reactor went critical at a research center near Pretoria, and South Africa joined the nuclear age. The feat was made possible by the firm that designed and built the equipment: Allis-Chalmers of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The Impact of Medicare

The Impact of Medicare

The Impact of Medicare

The Impact of Medicare

The Impact of Medicare

May 3, 1965
May 1965
The Impact of Medicare
This article focuses on the Medicare bill that has been proposed in the U.S. Congress. Medicare - as passed by the House - would discourage hospitals from making arrangements that would draw specialists into a comprehensive medical center. Every hospital under Medicare would have to follow the lead of the most progressive hospitals, and appoint a committee to review cases periodically, to see that no doctor was keeping his patient in the hospital too long. Another provision on the bill allows federal pressure on medical practices.

Trial by Gadget

Trial by Gadget

Trial by Gadget

Trial by Gadget

Trial by Gadget

September 28, 1964
September 1964
Trial by Gadget
The article presents information on lie detectors. The first lie detector, employed centuries ago, was a handful of rice dropped into the mouth of a suspect. If the rice stayed dry while he answered questions, he clearly was a liar- exposed under the questionable theory that a liar's salivary glands would dry up when gripped by fear. The lie detector used most commonly today is far more sophisticated. Developed by the psychologist and criminologist Leonard Keeler almost forty years ago, it comprises a pneumatic tube that fits across a subject's chest to measure breathing, an inflatable rubber cuff that wraps around the arm to measure blood pressure and a pair of electrodes that touch the fingers and by the flow of current, measure-the dampness of the palm.
No items found.