Racism

An Old Jewish Joke

An Old Jewish Joke

An Old Jewish Joke

An Old Jewish Joke

An Old Jewish Joke

November 18, 2015
November 2015
An Old Jewish Joke
There is an old Jewish joke about a religious man shipwrecked on a desert island. When his rescuers arrive a couple of years later, they discover he has built three huts during his isolation. One is his home. The other two? “This is the synagogue I go to,” he explained, “and that is the one I don’t go to.” The joke is supposed to reflect the disputatious nature of Jews — you can’t put two in the same room without expecting an argument, you can’t even put one alone without the same argument. Since a joke makes you laugh, this one is supposed to reflect the lighthearted nature of the disputes — they never cause lasting pain. Jews argue with each other but, in the end, always love each other...

Race and the Election

Race and the Election

Race and the Election

Race and the Election

Race and the Election

September 7, 2012
September 2012
Race and the Election
It must have been galling for the Republicans to see so many blacks voting for their own in the 2008 presidential election. The returns must have struck many Republicans as unfair, even undemocratic. Nothing else can explain the way the Republicans have allowed racism to stain their campaign against President Obama for a second term. No one likes to throw around so nasty an accusation, but I don’t know what else it is...

History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case

History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case

History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case

History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case

History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case

July 9, 2006
July 2006
History's new verdict on the Dreyfus case
[OPINION] Historians are hailing accused 19th-century spy Alfred Dreyfus as a hero, not a simple victim of anti-Semitism. In 1899, a broken Alfred Dreyfus accepted a presidential pardon — and its implication that he had committed treason against France. It was a matter of life or death, for Dreyfus feared that he would not survive the notorious penal colony on Devil's Island, where he had been sent after a military court convicted him of betraying his country. Those who believed that he was innocent and had called for his exoneration were deeply disappointed. "We were prepared to die for Dreyfus," said poet Charles Péguy, "but Dreyfus was not." His decision to accept a pardon is one of the cornerstones of a long-standing French perception that Dreyfus is the model of a submissive victim. But on the eve of the 100th anniversary of his exoneration in 1906 and the official end of the tumultuous affair that convulsed France for a dozen years, that view may be changing. Indeed, some historians see Dreyfus the patriot, not Dreyfus the victim...

Words, Words, Words

Words, Words, Words

Words, Words, Words

Words, Words, Words

Words, Words, Words

February 9, 1999
February 1999
Words, Words, Words
In Washington a few weeks ago, David Howard, a white gay man serving as the city's ombudsman, bemoaned the paucity of his budget. "I will have to be niggardly with this fund," he told coworkers, "because it's not going to be a lot of money." One of his listeners was shocked by the sound of the word and spread the news quickly that Howard had used an expression rooted in the hated epithet nigger. Blacks, who make up a majority of the capital's population, expressed their alarm and dismay...

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

August 29, 1963
August 1963
Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'
No Evidence of Any Effect on Congress - The historic civil rights march on Washington - massive and orderly and moving - has dramatized the wants of Negroes in America, but leaders still faced the task today of trying to turn drama into action. Speaker after speaker told the 200,000 Negro and white sympathizers massed in front of the Lincoln Memorial Wednesday that their demonstration was no more than a beginning. 'Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content,' said the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., 'will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual...'

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

June 11, 1963
June 1963
President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination
President Kennedy outlined a broad legislative program on civil rights tonight and asked the American people for help in ending racial discrimination and in stemming "the rising tide of discontent that perils the public safety." The President spoke to the nation after Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama bowed to federal pressure and stepped aside so two Negro students could register at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. In his radio-television talk, the President cited the Alabama crisis in making his appeal and outlining his legislative program...

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

April 16, 1955
April 1955
Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King
Twenty years ago, the late Sen. Theodore Bilbo (D-Miss), powered by two ideas, stepped into Congress. He had decided to resettle Negroes and save cotton. His first plan, to ship American Negroes to Africa, grabbed headlines all over the nation and made Bilbo the symbol of white supremacy in the South. The symbol grew so large it overshadowed the soundness of his second idea. But out of the plan to save cotton grew four regional research laboratories. These scientific centers now save American farmers, especially those of the South, millions of dollars each year...