Associated Press

Associated Press
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Associated Press

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'

August 29, 1963
August 1963
Massive Negro Demonstration 'Only a Beginning'
No Evidence of Any Effect on Congress - The historic civil rights march on Washington - massive and orderly and moving - has dramatized the wants of Negroes in America, but leaders still faced the task today of trying to turn drama into action. Speaker after speaker told the 200,000 Negro and white sympathizers massed in front of the Lincoln Memorial Wednesday that their demonstration was no more than a beginning. 'Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content,' said the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., 'will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual...'

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination

June 11, 1963
June 1963
President Kennedy Appeal to Nation to End Racial Discrimination
President Kennedy outlined a broad legislative program on civil rights tonight and asked the American people for help in ending racial discrimination and in stemming "the rising tide of discontent that perils the public safety." The President spoke to the nation after Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama bowed to federal pressure and stepped aside so two Negro students could register at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. In his radio-television talk, the President cited the Alabama crisis in making his appeal and outlining his legislative program...

New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations

New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations

New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations

New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations

New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations

April 4, 1963
April 1963
New Guidelines for Foreign Aid May Affect Specific Nations
FOREIGN AID PATTERN - Will the developing nations have to adjust their sights and hopes to meet the new look in American foreign aid? Officials at the Agency for International Development (AID) have declined to divulge just how the new guidelines for foreign aid will affect specific nations. But non-government experts surveyed by the Associated Press have applied the principles laid down by Gen. Lucius Clay's special study committee and by President Kennedy in his foreign aid message to congress on Tuesday, and generally have come up with these conclusions...

That Man, Jomo Kenyatta

That Man, Jomo Kenyatta

That Man, Jomo Kenyatta

That Man, Jomo Kenyatta

That Man, Jomo Kenyatta

December 23, 1962
December 1962
That Man, Jomo Kenyatta
The words came cold and clipped from the government secretary with gray hair and pale English skin. "When that man enters a room," she said, "I can feel the hackles rise up and down my back. Even if I don't see him, I can feel that man." That man is Jomo Kenyatta. A court has convicted him of managing the savage Mau Mau uprising in Kenya. A British governor has condemned him as "the African leader to darkness and death." Yet, within a year or two, when the colony of Kenya assumes independence, Jomo Kenyatta likely will be the new nation's first prime minister. The gray-haired Englishwoman and other white settlers watch this onrush to power helplessly, with distaste and bitterness. To them, a man streaked in evil and blood is reaching for their rolling, green land. But whites number no more than one per cent of Kenya's six million people. Africans see a different Kenyatta. To them, rather than streaked in evil and blood, he is hallowed with martyrdom and the glory of nationalism. His reach for rolling green land is theirs...

Task Forces Asked by Kennedy

Task Forces Asked by Kennedy

Task Forces Asked by Kennedy

Task Forces Asked by Kennedy

Task Forces Asked by Kennedy

January 6, 1961
January 1961
Task Forces Asked by Kennedy
Since election day, committees have tossed sheaves of paper on to the desk of President-Elect John F. Kennedy. The papers give him advice on how to reshape, readjust, or revitalize America. Kennedy asked for it. The committees are the special task forces he assigned to recommend ways to solve such problems as distressed areas, defense needs, and overcrowded schools. Kennedy appointed some before election day. The President-Elect asked prominent public officials to head some task forces. He named professors to head others. In one case, the task force comprised one man. Not all the reports have been made public. Not all have been endorsed. But, in general, the reports seem to follow Kennedy's campaign promises and may give some indication of the future course of his administration...

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King

April 16, 1955
April 1955
Bilbo Didn't Resettle Negroes, But he Saved the Cotton, it's Still King
Twenty years ago, the late Sen. Theodore Bilbo (D-Miss), powered by two ideas, stepped into Congress. He had decided to resettle Negroes and save cotton. His first plan, to ship American Negroes to Africa, grabbed headlines all over the nation and made Bilbo the symbol of white supremacy in the South. The symbol grew so large it overshadowed the soundness of his second idea. But out of the plan to save cotton grew four regional research laboratories. These scientific centers now save American farmers, especially those of the South, millions of dollars each year...